QA With Laura Jenkins, Our Newest ODD Family Member // Massage Therapist

laura jenkins massage one down doglaura jenkins massage one down dog

We’re thrilled to welcome Laura Jenkins, our new massage therapist in Silverlake location of One Down Dog! Click here to read Laura’s bio.


Why should I incorporate Massage Therapy into my fitness/wellness regimen?

You take your car in for a tune-up, or an oil change right? Well, think of your body as your vehicle.  You’re working out and taking Yoga!  That’s a great start.  Those muscles are working, getting stronger, keeping your body moving and fit.  Ever feel sore, stiff, tight or plain old tired?  Your muscles need some lovin’ too.  Massage Therapy helps push all that lactic acid out of your tissues which helps aid in a faster recovery.  Overworked, tight muscles need to release tension before they start overcompensating for other areas or joints of the body.  The goal is maintenance and balance for your muscles.  If you want to be able to keep moving, massage is important. Aside from all the other amazing health benefits of massage, active folk should make massage a definite part of their routine.

What style of Massage do you do?

I combine various techniques to cater to your specific needs.  This isn’t your typical spa experience.  I focus on specific areas of need, or do a general tune-up of the body using techniques such as deep tissue, swedish, traction, range of motion, trigger point release, myofascial to name a few.  I consider it Therapeutic Massage.  I work with you to find out what your body likes and what it responds to best.  Don’t worry — I won’t make you cry unless it’s needed. ;)   Most importantly, always be open and honest with your therapist.  Be vocal when you feel the need, so you can communicate on what your body is supposed to be responding to or feeling.  And yes, I can also do a very stress-free, relaxing, “put me in the best mood ever” massage as well as prenatal.

How do I schedule an appointment? 

The best way to schedule is to e-mail me directly: My schedule is flexible, but also depends on classes happening at One Down Dog (Silver Lake).  Day times are the best times.  But I get it — some of us do have 9-5ers.  E-mail me a couple different options of the best days/times that work for you, and we’ll make it happen.

How much does it cost?

$110 – 60 Minute Session

$150 – 90 Minute Session

$475 – 5 Session Package (60 min/$75 savings!)

**ODD unlimited auto-pay members receive 10%!**

What’s your favorite Yoga Pose?


Do you have an Instagram?

Yes! @amassagetherapist
#downforamassage #oddmassage #followforfollow

Did you know One Down Dog is now offering Massage Therapy?!

laura jenkins massage one down doglaura jenkins massage one down dog

We’re so excited to announce that we are now offering massage therapy once again! We’d like to introduce, Laura Jenkins, our new massage therapist.

Laura moved to Silver Lake, Los Angeles this past January from Philadelphia, PA where she lived for twelve years.  She grew up in Poughkeepsie, NY and moved to Philly for college at the University of the Arts. Here she graduated in 2007 with a BFA in Modern Dance Performance.  She then began a collaborative dance company PINK HAIR AFFAIR, and co-directed, choreographed and performed for various projects and productions. Laura also performed and toured with Brian Sanders’ JUNK dancing on/in/and around doors, scooters, garbage cans, sand, aerial contraptions, others bodies and more junk! Between all of that she was an NFL Cheerleader for four years, ending her final season as Captain for the Philadelphia Eagles. She even had the honor of being one of the select five cheerleaders to perform for the troops in Kuwait & Iraq.

Along side her dancing, choreographing, and creating, she went back to school to become a Massage Therapist.  She wanted to use her experience and knowledge of the body to help other movers of the world maintain their movement through massage. After becoming certified she started working at a fitness and rehab facility with Physical Therapists, and Exercise Physiologists. Here she learned and practiced most of her techniques with corrective, injury, sports and rehab massage work. She also worked at various spas and yoga studios. She then opened her own practice, Massage Studio of Philadelphia and was once again employed by the Philadelphia Eagles as a Massage Therapist for the players 2014-2015 Season.

Laura is excited to venture into the Yoga world a bit more. Taking a pause from dance to settle into this new city, she reluctantly turned to yoga for the sake of her movement sanity. Turns out, she is really starting to enjoy it!  She is so thankful to have found One Down Dog, and is beyond grateful to offer massage therapy to all ODD yogis (and of course others!).

Interested in scheduling a massage? Email Laura to get more info.

Rocktober Halloween Themed Class with Bobbi in Silverlake

Rocktober Halloween Yoga Class One Down Dog

Join Bobbi on Halloween for ROCKTOBER – October 31st, from 4-5:30pm at One Down Dog Silverlake location.

A playful yoga flow that will open you up for exploring a few arm balances and of course, spending some time dancing it out to the best rock jams from classic, to punk, to grunge and some current faves. This class will be fun and challenging yet accessible for all levels. There will be spooky sweet treats!

$10 donation - A portion of the class fee will be donated to UNICEF’s Save The Children Foundation for those displaced in Syria. Any additional donations collected will go directly to UNICEF.

“Hallieween” Themed Class at ODD Eagle Rock!


Don’t Be A Scaredy Cat! Join Our Halloween Themed Flow Class in Eagle Rock!

Pump(kin) up your practice! Join me for a special 75 minute Hallieween Halloween themed Flow class! Get in the spirit with Halloween inspired yoga poses (cat pose, corpse, there are so many!) tunes and a costume contest!

The yogi with the best costume will win a free class!

Breathable and moveable costumes are encouraged, dressing up is not mandatory. Plus, we will have treats after class so stick around!

We may have outgrown trick-or-treating, but we can still have fun and celebrate Halloween! All levels are welcome, including ghosts, zombies and witches.

See you on the mat!

12 Tips for New Yoga Teachers from Clara Roberts-Oss

clara roberts oss one down dog

Clara Roberts-Oss, international yoga teacher extraordinaire, is coming to ODD for an entire weekend of trainings! Friday’s session is open to all levels and will explore chakras and mantras. Saturday’s session is geared specifically toward advanced practitioners and teachers focusing on advanced poses. Sunday’s sessions is for teachers only and will dive into backbends and inversions.

Interested in furthering your practice and/or teaching skills? Sign up before they sell out – only 10 spaces left!

Clara has had years of experience as a teacher and yogi. Over the years she’s learned a lot! She’s graciously shared with us 12 tips for new yoga teachers.

1) Keep it simple. 
Keep everything you do while you teach as simple as possible, your sequence, your language, your music. You are learning a new language, learn the nouns, verbs and such before you jump into conversational yoga. You will appear more confident with your students and they are more likely to trust you.

1a) Speak Slowly.
Speak even slower than you think you should. New teachers are excited about sharing what they’ve learned and that excitement tends to make them nervous and that nervousness tends to speed up the cuing, the breathing and soon enough people are moving so quickly there’s no way they can be breathing with integration. Breathe with your students, speak painfully slow—usually that makes you speak normally, versus very quickly. Schylar Grant offered using a metronome at home to practice speaking slowly. Carolyn Budgell recommends recording your voice and listening to it. I recommend taping your foot quietly or using the beats in the song to give you a sense of timing. The important thing is, be conscious of your speaking speed, it is a large part of what creates the Bhavana (mood) of the class.

2) Have patience and compassion towards yourself. 
The first few years are hard. You are going to make mistakes and people are going to give you attitude. Try not to be hard on yourself or your students. Learn from your mistakes and trust in the process and know that it gets easier.

3) Get off your mat as soon as possible. 
As a new teacher, it’s fine to practice the sequence with your students but ween yourself off the mat as soon as possible. You are more useful to your students if you’re watching them. This is why I encourage new teachers to have simple sequences, so that they don’t need to be doing it with the class in order to remember it. Elaborate sequences may seem cool but does it ultimately serve the students if their teachers are paying more attention to remembering the sequence than watching them?

4) Own the space.
Be loving yet hold your ground. This is your classroom, be confident in the choices you make with lighting, temperature, music. This one was especially hard for me to learn. I started teaching very young. Older women liked to give me hard time by complaining about the music, the temperature and talking in class. They were some of my greatest teachers. They taught me how to stand my ground, believe in my choices as a teacher or change them if need be. Which leads me to…

5) Your students can be your greatest teachers.
Observe who triggers you in class. They are usually either echoing something about yourself that you don’t like or are not proud of. For me, those women where echoing my own feelings of self worth. Who was I to teach people? What did I have to offer? Observe what arises with those students and silently thank them for the lesson. Try and stay compassionate towards them and yourself while in the room. Then work with the triggers by meditating or talking to a therapist/friend about it.

6) Develop a consistent home practice.
This is going to feed you, especially during times of stagnation in your teaching. Your home practice is not a time when you’re developing your class sequences, I like to think of it as my upkeep. I do the poses and pranayama that my body really needs for the day. It doesn’t look like a vinyasa practice, it’s more therapeutic. It changes daily depending upon what I need and how I’m doing.

7) If you do nothing else in your own time, MEDITATE.
This was a game changer for me. I was initiated into a few years back into Neelakantha Meditation practice and had to pledge to sit 20 min every day for a year and it hooked me. This will feed you as a human and a teacher on many levels. You will be able to access compassion, strength and remain grounded in most situations. Please start today! Start by sitting for just 10 min daily and begin to increase it when you feel ready.

8) Practice the sequence in your own body prior to teaching it.
You should know how the sequence feels before you share it. If you make it up on the spot, you are more likely to forget it. I tell new teachers to teach the same sequence for a week or two so that they can focus on watching their students instead of remembering the sequence.

9) Practice different styles of Yoga
There is so much to be learned from different lineages of Yoga. It’s important to experience other ways of moving and to remember what it’s like being new at something. I find it helps me understand my students more. Two of my most influential teachers, Shiva Rea and Constantine Darling, incorporate different lineages into their teaching, giving me as the practitioner, a richer experience.

10) Create a Teacher’s Practice.
This was another game changer for me. When I moved to Vancouver eight years ago, I was invited to a teacher’s practice. I had never seen that before. We sat around in a circle and co-taught (round robin style). We picked a peak pose and created the flow together. It was an informal space where we asked each other questions, gave each other feedback on our asanas and execution. I grew as a teacher like I never had prior. It also builds a stronger kula/community amongst teachers which fed our student kula exponentially. Invite any and all teachers, no matter what style or what studio they’re from, there is always something to learn.

11) Don’t stop being a student.
Take other people’s classes. Attend teacher trainings. Continue to learn. We are students first and foremost. I look at teaching as a way of sharing things that excite me. Continue to feed yourself so you can continue to share.

and my last one for today….

12) Don’t take yourself too seriously.
As my father says so beautifully, We are all bozos on this bus. I try to think of myself as a facilitator. I am here to facilitate my students journey into themselves. I try and create a space that is safe for them to explore their inner landscapes. Teaching is not about me, it’s about them. It’s an important one to remember. At the end of the day, it doesn’t matter how cool your sequence is, whether a ton of people told you how great you are or if your playlist worked. Instead ask yourself, did people leave feeling more connected to themselves, more quiet, more introspective? To me that’s the sign of a good class. And if it didn’t happen, so be it. I’ll try again next time.

Clara Roberts-Oss One Down Dog Yoga Silverlake Workshop

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